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WHAT TO EAT IN MACAU


Great Food in Macau


A visit to Macau at any time of the year is a delicious feast for all the senses – not least the taste buds. Savoury or sweet, Western or Asian, a full-blown banquet or merely a simple snack, the plentiful gastronomic legacy of Portugal, China and Macau and the best of international cuisine converge in a menu that is tantalisingly varied. The only dilemma is deciding what to eat in Macau!
 


The tradition of fusion food

The peninsula benefits from a rich and delectable culinary heritage, all showcased in the wide range of mouth-watering dishes available in the many restaurants in Macau. From breakfast to supper, there are many culinary delights to satisfy your every craving in a colourful local cuisine that is influenced by both Portuguese and Chinese traditions. Just don't forget to leave room for those unique Macanese treats!  

When Portuguese traders landed in Macau in the 16th century, they brought with them a love of food and wine, which is still evident in the Macau food of today.  So much more than a simple blend of East and West, the Portuguese influence on cuisine also takes inspiration from the interesting culinary traditions of South America and Africa.  The Chinese added a pinch of their own gastronomic style with colourful flavours from the rest of Asia - like turmeric and coconut - converging in a menu that evokes the exotic.


Macanese Delights

As in many cuisines, the most unassuming dishes are often the most satisfying. One of the most popular snacks in Macao, day or night, is the famed pork chop bun. Just as described, this is a seasoned, deep-fried pork chop in a baguette-type bun, unadulterated by dressings or salad - and is simply delicious!

Try Feijoada (pork with black beans) or the spicy cultural fusion of Portuguese Chicken. Visitors with a sweet-tooth will enjoy Serradura (Macanese 'sawdust' pudding), a heady blend of condensed milk and cream layered with biscuit crumbs - an ideal mid-afternoon sugar-fix or the perfect sweet finale to any meal. 

No discovery of Macau food is complete without trying the famed pasta del nata (egg custard tarts) - from the famous Lord Stow's Bakery & Café, with its convenient branch at the Shoppes at Venetian. This sweet treat is a perfect pick-me-up; and the café offers a refreshing rest stop in a busy day of retail therapy.


Worldwide Flavours

Along with the unique delights of local cuisine, the peninsula also has an infinite variety of international food on offer. The only dilemma facing hungry visitors is deciding what to eat in Macao! 

Whether you are looking for Vietnamese Pho, spicy Korean Kimchi, classic Italian dining or the casual ambience of an American steakhouse, you can practically eat your way around the globe from the critically acclaimed dishes on offer. 

The Venetian Macao alone has over 30 restaurants, including Canton for award-winning Cantonese delicacies, and Portofino for heart-warming Italian cuisine and Golden Peacock, the only Michelin-starred Indian cuisine in Asia. At the neighbouring Conrad Macao in Sands Cotai Central, Dynasty 8 creates authentic high-end Chinese cuisine, making every meal a special occasion. 

If you are short of time or want to sample an international buffet all on one plate, head to Grand Orbit at the Conrad Macao for a feast of Macanese, Creole and Asian cuisine - a kaleidoscopic taste sensation of exotic spices.

With so many restaurants in Macau, one thing is certain: you'll never leave Macau hungry!


Our favourite Macanese Treats

  1. MINCHI
    Macanese comfort food, based on minced meat, served with potatoes and topped with a fried egg.
  2. GALINHA À AFRICANA
    A whole, juicy chicken baked with chillies, coconut and turmeric.
  3. CALDO VERDE
    A popular Macanese starter: a hearty soup of potatoes and pak choi.
  4. CURRIED CRAB
    Beloved in many parts of China, this crustacean is baked in its shell and served with curry sauce and stir-fried vegetables.
  5. PORK WITH BALICHAO AND TAMARIND
    Pork hotpot, cooked with Macanese shrimp paste (balichao) and tart tamarind. The peninsula's own version of sweet and sour pork.